How to Help a French Bulldog With Separation Anxiety

How to Help a French Bulldog With Separation Anxiety

Many dog breeds have separation anxiety when their owners leave the house. French Bulldogs are no different. In fact, French Bulldogs are extremely prone to separation anxiety.

You've probably noticed your dog going crazy as you're getting ready to leave. But fear no more!

In this article, we'll discuss separation anxiety and how to stop your dog from turning into a lunatic whenever you leave for work.

What is French Bulldog separation anxiety?

Separation anxiety is a big deal for some dogs. It's different from general anxiety and occurs when you leave your dog alone for a period of time. Your dog can experience varying levels of stress when left alone. It can become a very serious problem that comes with destructive behavior.

Dogs that are overly attached to family members might experience separation anxiety. They'll become extremely anxious and show anxiety behaviors.

Symptoms of separation anxiety

Let's take a look at the symptoms of separation anxiety in French Bulldogs.

  1. Destruction
  2. Vocalization (barking)
  3. Pooping or peeing in the house
  4. Shake or shiver
  5. Refuse to eat

How to stop separation anxiety in French Bulldogs

Fixing your dog's separation anxiety issues can take time and dedication. You'll need a calm routine and patience.

Here are 5 key steps in eliminating or reducing your dog's separation anxiety.

5 Ways to stop your  French Bulldogs separation anxiety

1. Vigorous play & activity before you leave the house

Both playtime and training sessions are an excellent way to interact with your dog before leaving the house. Dogs are social creatures and need social interaction.

It's a great idea to play with your dog for 15-30 minutes before departure. Playtime can be done with toys and games or training sessions.

At Xen Pets, we recommend quick training sessions. Your dog will work both their body and minds during these sessions. Remember to provide positive reinforcement during their training sessions. Your dog will thank you!

Overall, they'll thoroughly enjoy their time spent with you. With enough activity and social interaction, their separation anxiety levels can be reduced.

2. Move your dog into a relaxation area with toys and sounds

After you're finished playing, move your French Bulldog into a relaxation area. This can be either the kitchen or family room where they'll get some toys and maybe a treat.

In this area, turn on the TV or calming music to help soothe their anxious mind. Soft sounds are great for separation anxiety and to keep your dog calm.

3. Ignore your dog for 30 minutes before departure

Next, and this is the sad part, you'll want to ignore your dog for about 30 minutes before leaving.

They've had their interaction with you during training and playtime and now it's time for them to be on their own.

4. Don't let your dog know you're leaving the house

There are a number of things that will trigger your dog's separation anxiety. From the keys jingling to the garage door opening - these can be a big deal and upset a French Bulldog with separation anxiety.

It's best to move quietly when leaving the house for the day. Making your lunch or putting on makeup should be done when your dog is enjoying their treat in their relaxation area.

After some time, this step won't be as important. But for a French Bulldog with severe separation anxiety, it's best to keep quiet.

5. Avoid saying goodbye

Lastly, avoid saying goodbye. It can be heartbreaking but saying goodbye can trigger separation anxiety and destructive behavior.

It's best to leave the house quietly while your dog is calm and busy with their toys and treats.

Bottom line

Managing separation anxiety can be difficult to handle and takes time to fix. Stick with our tips and you'll make great progress in creating a happy and healthy dog.

Another great tip to manage separation anxiety is crate training. It might sound sad, leaving your puppy or adult dog in a crate all day while you're at work, but it's actually the opposite. A well trained French Bulldog will learn to love their crate and all the toys and treats in it.

Good luck and don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter for more training and health tips!

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By Tory Johnson

Tory Johnson is a veteran dog trainer, dog behaviorist, and canine nutritionist with 10+ years experience.

ToryĀ hasĀ helped countless families have beautiful relationships with their canine companions.

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